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zachklein:

Excerpted from a 1990 Bill Watterson commencement speech, via Diana Wattanapongsakorn.

zachklein:

Excerpted from a 1990 Bill Watterson commencement speech, via Diana Wattanapongsakorn.

Photos by a 5-Year-Old

My son Finn took all these photos (except for the first one, which is him). I was at a cousin’s wedding with my DSLR, getting mostly unremarkable results. So I handed the camera to him, made sure he had the strap secured around his wrist, and cut him loose. Apparently he bumped the shutter speed at some point, which created awesome results. I didn’t touch these up or add any filters before posting. My favorite is the one he took of Kristina. Only he could capture that look she gives her boys. 

Samuel Hudson’s first trip to the lake.

Samuel Hudson’s first trip to the lake.

vizualize:

The Internet Map
Russian data-visualisation designer Ruslan Enikeev has mapped websites according to levels of activity and the other sites visited by their users.via The Guardian

This is eerily and perhaps appropriately similar to the game Osmos, in which large blobs can swallow other blobs to become the biggest.

vizualize:

The Internet Map

Russian data-visualisation designer Ruslan Enikeev has mapped websites according to levels of activity and the other sites visited by their users.

via The Guardian

This is eerily and perhaps appropriately similar to the game Osmos, in which large blobs can swallow other blobs to become the biggest.
Jonathan

Jonathan

Finnegan

Finnegan

dallasclayton:

Miss Haviland: Is there any point that you would like to make, aside from the questions that have been brought up to you before and which you’ve answered again tonight?
Mr. Sendak: I love my work very much, it means everything to me. I would like to see a time when children’s books were not segregated from adult books, a time when people didn’t think of children’s books as a minor art form, a little Peterpanville, a cutsey-darling place where you could Have Fun, Laugh Your Head Off. I know so many adult writers whom I would happily chop into pieces, who say, “Well I think I’ll take a moment and sit down and knock off a kiddy book! It looks like so much fun, it’s obviously easy…” And, of course, they write a lousy book!
It would be so much better if everyone felt that children’s books are for everybody, that we simply write books, that we are a community of writers and artists, that we are all seriously involved in the business of writing. And if everyone felt that writing for children is a serious business, perhaps even more serious than a lot of other forms of writing, and if when such books are reviewed and discussed, they were discussed on this serious level, and that we would be taken seriously as artists.
I would like to do away with the division into age categories of children over here and adults over there, which is confusing to me and I think probably confusing to children. It’s very confusing to many people who don’t even know how to buy a children’s book. I think if I have any particular hope it’s this: that we all should simply be artists and just write books and stop pretending that there is such a thing as being able to sit down and write a book for a child: it is quite impossible. One simply writes books.
– Questions to an Artist Who Is Also an Author: A Conversation between Maurice Sendak and Virginia Haviland (a public interview at the Library of Congress held in 1971)
Maurice Sendak, a great inspiration… you will be missed.

dallasclayton:

Miss Haviland: Is there any point that you would like to make, aside from the questions that have been brought up to you before and which you’ve answered again tonight?

Mr. Sendak: I love my work very much, it means everything to me. I would like to see a time when children’s books were not segregated from adult books, a time when people didn’t think of children’s books as a minor art form, a little Peterpanville, a cutsey-darling place where you could Have Fun, Laugh Your Head Off. I know so many adult writers whom I would happily chop into pieces, who say, “Well I think I’ll take a moment and sit down and knock off a kiddy book! It looks like so much fun, it’s obviously easy…” And, of course, they write a lousy book!

It would be so much better if everyone felt that children’s books are for everybody, that we simply write books, that we are a community of writers and artists, that we are all seriously involved in the business of writing. And if everyone felt that writing for children is a serious business, perhaps even more serious than a lot of other forms of writing, and if when such books are reviewed and discussed, they were discussed on this serious level, and that we would be taken seriously as artists.

I would like to do away with the division into age categories of children over here and adults over there, which is confusing to me and I think probably confusing to children. It’s very confusing to many people who don’t even know how to buy a children’s book. I think if I have any particular hope it’s this: that we all should simply be artists and just write books and stop pretending that there is such a thing as being able to sit down and write a book for a child: it is quite impossible. One simply writes books.

– Questions to an Artist Who Is Also an Author: A Conversation between Maurice Sendak and Virginia Haviland (a public interview at the Library of Congress held in 1971)

Maurice Sendak, a great inspiration… you will be missed.

theatlantic:

“This is how Maurice Sendak sometimes sent his letters. Just imagine getting one.” (via Letters Of Note)

theatlantic:

“This is how Maurice Sendak sometimes sent his letters. Just imagine getting one.” (via Letters Of Note)

And what a play it had been! Drowsy animals, snug in their holes while wind and rain were battering at their doors, recalled still keen mornings, an hour before sunrise, when the white mist, as yet undispersed, clung closely along the surface of the water; then the shock of the early plunge, the scamper along the bank, and the radiant transformation of earth, air, and water, when suddenly the sun was with them again, and grey was gold and colour was born and sprang out of the earth once more. They recalled the languorous siesta of hot mid-day, deep in green undergrowth, the sun striking through in tiny golden shafts and spots; the boating and bathing of the afternoon, the rambles along dusty lanes and through yellow cornfields; and the long, cool evening at last, when so many threads were gathered up, so many friendships rounded, and so many adventures planned for the morrow.
Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows
Kylie.gif

Kylie.gif

Saturday Night
  • Me:

    (dancing)

  • Finn:

    Do you hear music?

  • Me:

    (still dancing) In my head.

  • Finn:

    There's no music in there.

Taken with instagram

Taken with instagram

Nomenclature
  • Finn:

    Oh. The hugest phone with the buttons that you work on. I can't remember what's that's called.

  • Kristina:

    A computer?

  • Finn:

    Oh yeah. A computer.